Glue for passive xover

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Glue for passive xover

Postby clist » Fri Apr 02, 2010 8:28 pm

Hello,
Been a while since I posted, but I see all the posts.

I have to make a bunch of passive xovers. In the past I would use wire ties into tempered pegboard, but that has a weak point.
If a heavy inductor moves sideways it slices through the taught plastic zip tie like a knife.

All the big boys use some kind of liquid glue that stays pliable, but it does not let the inductor move very much.
I have to use a lot of this so it needs to be cheap (when I buy a large quantity).
Also I have to be able to peel the stuff off to do repairs.

I have seen "hot-pots" that use some kind wax/plastic/rubber/whatever that looks promising. I have heard the fumes are toxic.

Also there are some "dipping" compound that they use to protect router bits after they are sharpened.

The stuff I see on Peavey xovers is a tan color and never gets hard.
They use a lot so it must be cheap.

Any ideas?

REMEMBER: It has to come off. No liquid nail. I have fixed xovers where they used liquid nail and it was UGLY!

Thanks

PS-The new speaker I have been working on will be released as soon as I get the xovers finished.
BMS 12CN680, passive xover and a Baltic Birch wedge for stage use.
Too Tall
Curtis H. List
Bridgeport, Mich.
I.A.T.S.E. Local # 274 (Gold Card)
Lansing, Mich. local

Independent Live Sound Engineer (and I'm Tall Too!)
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Re: Glue for passive xover

Postby DVDdoug » Fri Apr 02, 2010 10:56 pm

I don't know what the manufacturers are using... Maybe silicone RTV would work? It stays pliable, but you probably can't peel it off completely.

Also there are some "dipping" compound that they use to protect router bits after they are sharpened.

Plasti-Dip. I've seen it in the paint department of a hardware store.

I'm surprised about the zip-ties! Those things seem pretty tough. I can't break them (even the small ones) with my bare hands! Maybe a cable clamp if you can find one the right size. (You can get these things in the electrical dept. of a hardware/home improvement store.)
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Re: Glue for passive xover

Postby lvw » Sat Apr 03, 2010 2:01 am

Curtis,
I've found RTV to be very reliable. While it's not easy to remove all traces from a coil, that coil can be pretty easily detached by using a knife with a thin, flexible, blade to cut the RTV between the component and the board. Do you need to remove all traces of the glue from the component, or just make a neat looking repair? The knife will usually only leave traces on the mounting board.

Larry Van Wormer
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Re: Glue for passive xover

Postby llung » Sat Apr 03, 2010 3:18 am

I use silicone caulking along with zip ties. Hot glue also works. With either, you can apply a bed of the adhesive and stick the inductor into it, then zip it to the board. Or zip tie first and apply around the inductor after. I prefer the former. You can definitely remove the part from the adhesive later if you need to. Caulk would be cheaper and easier to apply in large quantities.

-lou
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Re: Glue for passive xover

Postby mike mccall » Sun May 09, 2010 2:49 pm

Hi Curtis,

While I seldom used anything but zip-ties to anchor components, there were occasions where I would use hot glue. I preferred that over silicone RTV as for me it was less messy. I imagine either would work well, although I'm sure there are dedicated compounds available.

Warm regards,

Mike
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Re: Glue for passive xover

Postby clist » Thu Nov 25, 2010 3:54 pm

I have seen big inductors slice through any wire tie if it is at a 90 degree angle like what you get when you lay an air core on its side.
These are 12 gauge large value (4.0mH and larger.)
The reason you don't see it is you do not use and repair speakers used for touring PA.
Speaker boxes get thrown 4 to 6 feet in the air and even the Baltic birch plywood fails.
Too Tall
Curtis H. List
Bridgeport, Mich.
I.A.T.S.E. Local # 274 (Gold Card)
Lansing, Mich. local

Independent Live Sound Engineer (and I'm Tall Too!)
clist
 
Posts: 34
Joined: Mon Nov 12, 2007 3:14 pm


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